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Immunohistochemistry Collection

  • Register
    • Non-member - $80
    • Core Member - $60
    • Student Member - $60
    • Enhanced Member - Free!

The collection offers the 4 of the highest rated IHC & Molecular focused NSH workshops.   The collection includes:

  • IHC Workflow: Busting the Myth of the "Ideal" Workflow
  • IHC Optimization and Validation: Real World Solutions for a Standardized Approach
  • IHC and Molecular Pathology Tests in Tissue-based Cancer Diagnosis
  • Checkpoint Inhibitors as Cancer Treatments

CEUs: This package contains four histology courses worth 1 continuing education credit per course.  Registrants that include their Florida License Number in their NSH account have credits automatically reported to CE Broker by NSH. The courses are available for 365 days from date of purchase. 

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/14/2021

    What is the ideal IHC workflow? Should you run your slides in batches or process them in a continuous flow? The answer of course, is that it depends.

    What is the ideal IHC workflow? Should you run your slides in batches or process them in a continuous flow? The answer of course, is that it depends. Because your lab is unique and each day is full of surprises, there may not be one ideal IHC workflow. The key instead is an adaptable workflow that matches your lab's daily needs. In this presentation, we will look at the importance of understanding what you are doing now, what tools you might use to analyze your process, and how to best decide on the right solutions for you.

    CEUs: This histology course is worth 1 continuing education credit. Course is available for 365 days from date of purchase.   

    Ashley Troutman, MBA, HT(ASCP), QIHC, CLSSBB

    Senior Principal Content & Evidence

    Leica Biosystems

    Ashley Troutman has been involved in Laboratory Medicine for more than 20 years in clinical, research and administrative capacities. He has worked in facilities of all sizes, from small community hospitals and private labs to large academic medical centers and corporate reference labs. He has extensive experience in laboratory science and management, specifically in anatomic pathology and immunohistochemistry. He has managed routine histology operations and has been part of the team to aid researchers in designing experiments using histologic techniques. These roles have allowed Ashley, a Certified Lean/Six Sigma Black Belt, to lead work-process implementation teams that saw success in scientific innovation as well as improving laboratory efficiency through areas of waste/cost reduction, process improvement and safety.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/14/2021

    This presentation will enable participants to fully grasp why optimization and validation are critical to creating a standardized approach to immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the clinical setting.

    This presentation will enable participants to fully grasp why optimization and validation are critical to creating a standardized approach to immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the clinical setting. Other presentations focus on meeting accreditation standards; however, a recognisable gap exists between accreditation requirements and the development of a comprehensive understanding of why the standards exist. The presentation will begin with a review of the theory and practicality of optimization, common to all IHC assays. Tools will be given to participants to introduce standardization into their own optimization procedures. Once an insight into the landscape of variability, with over four million possible assay protocols, is established, participants will be led through the validation phase, including the requirements for predictive markers. Again, theory, practice and tools will be shared. Participants are expected to come out of this presentation with the means to standardize the introduction of new IHC assays in their own laboratories.

    CEUs: This histology course is worth 1 continuing education credit. Course is available for 365 days from date of purchase.   

    Jeremy Johnston, HT(ASCP)QIHC

    Mr. Johnston specializes in histology, immunohistochemistry, molecular and lab management. He received his BS in Chemistry from George Fox University and is a member of the National Society of Histotechnology (NSH), American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), Washington State Histology Society (WSHS), California Histology Society (CSH), Texas Society of Histotechnology (TSH), College of American Pathologists (CAP), International Society for IHC and Molecular Morphology (ISIMM). Jeremy is married to Sara and they have three beautiful kids (Sadie, Micah, and Tessa). Jeremy enjoys hanging out with his family and playing soccer in his spare time.

    Nadia Gale

    Nadia is the Technical Practice Lead for Anatomic Pathology services within Vancouver Coastal Health. Her work involves all of the technical aspects of Anatomic Pathology, however her passion lies within the realm of protein expression and all things immunohistochemistry.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/15/2021

    This intermediate level workshop focuses on the relevance of IHC and molecular pathology tests in tissue-based cancer diagnosis including diagnosis of cancer subtypes, application of IHC in cancer research, use of IHC tests to predict therapeutic response in tumors such as, carcinoma of lung and breast, and advantages and disadvantages of IHC tests in clinical use.

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC), is a powerful tool for diagnostic surgical pathology and has become a crucial technology which is widely used in clinical and research laboratories worldwide. It has been a reliable test for diagnosis of cancers because of defined tumor antigen expressions, up regulation, or down regulation, that can be detected in many cancers using frozen or formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (EEPE) tissues. It has been established that IHC tests play an important role in diagnostic pathology of different tumor types, such as liquid tumors (hematopathology) and solid tumors including but not limited to central nervous system tumors, bone and soft tissue tumors, gastrointestinal tumors, gynecologic tumors, head and neck tumors and pulmonary tumors. In addition, tissue-based molecular testing of tumors offers an increasingly important focus on multiplex platform to simultaneously test cancer mutations for all cancer types including tumor genotyping to aid in targeted cancer therapy. This intermediate level workshop focuses on the relevance of IHC and molecular pathology tests in tissue-based cancer diagnosis including diagnosis of cancer subtypes, application of IHC in cancer research, use of IHC tests to predict therapeutic response in tumors such as, carcinoma of lung and breast, and advantages and disadvantages of IHC tests in clinical use.

    CEUs: This histology course is worth 1 continuing education credit. Course is available for 365 days from date of purchase.   

    Aniruddha Ganguly, PhD, QIHC(ASCP)

    National Cancer Institute/ NIH

    Dr. Aniruddha Ganguly earned his Ph.D. in Cell Biology and trained in tumor biology. He has expertise in mechanisms of tumor development and metastasis, tumor microenvironment, biospecimen processing, cancer biomarkers, clinical assay development, cancer diagnostics, and molecular analysis technologies for cancer research. Before joining the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as a Program Director, Dr. Ganguly served as an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School/Harvard University for many years directing and conducting cancer research, and teaching MD/DMD students. He was supervisor of the IHC Clinical Services Laboratory of the department of Pathology at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. At the NCI, he has responsibilities for providing guidance to the planning, development, implementation, and evaluation of assigned biomedical research programs including, molecular diagnostic technologies, Extracellular RNA Consortium, brain tumor research and NCI's brain tumor clinical trial program. He has a strong emphasis in training, mentoring, and promoting young investigators involved in cancer research.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/16/2021

    This session will focus on the role of the immune system in the control of tumors and how tumors can diminish this response. We will then explore novel immunotherapies that allow for a return to a functioning immune response. Importantly, we will talk about the histopathology testing required to determine if these treatments will be beneficial to a patient and monitor if they are effective.

    The immune system has developed many mechanisms to activate robust immune responses. There are also very powerful mechanisms to dampen and control that response in order to protect against a damaging and excessive immune reactions. These dampening systems include immune checkpoint proteins like PD-1, PD-L1, and CTLA-4. These proteins are important to promote self-tolerance by suppressing the activity of T cells and protect against autoimmune responses. Some malignancies have been shown to hijack these checkpoint pathways and “put the brakes on” the immune response so the tumor can evade immune destruction. Therapies, utilizing monoclonal antibodies, have been developed to “release the brakes” on these immune cells and allow the immune response to continue. This therapeutic approach has revolutionized cancer immunotherapy for several tumor types. This session will focus on the role of the immune system in the control of tumors and how tumors can diminish this response. We will then explore novel immunotherapies that allow for a return to a functioning immune response. Importantly, we will talk about the histopathology testing required to determine if these treatments will be beneficial to a patient and monitor if they are effective.

    CEUs: This histology course is worth 1 continuing education credit. Course is available for 365 days from date of purchase.   

    Julie Habecker, PhD

    Professor, Chief of Pathology

    Dr. Randolph-Habecker has over 25 years of histology and pathology experience. She earned a Masters of Science in Clinical Chemistry and Ph.D. in Pathology from The Ohio State University. Julie did her postdoctoral work in Transplantation Biology at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center in Seattle before transitioning to the Director of Experimental Histopathology Shared Resources for over 13 years. She is now an Associate Professor of Pathology at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences. She has collaborated in many areas including cancer, infectious disease, chronic illnesses, vaccine development, stem cell biology, and developmental biology. In addition to her research pathology knowledge, she also has extensive experience in the laboratory operations, supervision of staff, study design, sample acquisition, and data analysis. Julie has a long history of providing training and educational opportunities for learners ranging from grade school to undergraduate and postgraduate level, including physicians, scientists, technicians, non-scientific staff, patients and their families, and the community. Dr. Randolph-Habecker has also contributed to the implementation of a histopathology infrastructure in low resource and medically underserved areas.