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**2020 Symposium/Convention IHC Package

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Upskill your knowledge of IHC and Molecular with this five session package featuring popular talks from the 2020 Virtual Symposium/Convention.  

Sessions Included in this Package:  

  • Checkpoint Inhibitors as Cancer Treatments
  • Predictive IHC Markers in Breast Cancer 2020:  What Have We Learned?
  • Optimization and Validation of Immunohistochemistry Protocols
  • The Advantages of RNA Probes over DNA Probes for the Detection of HPV HR in Human Pathology
  • Unraveling the Unknown About the Tissue Microenvironment Using a Highly Multiplexed Technique: Imaging Mass Cytometry

  • Unraveling the Unknown About the Tissue Microenvironment Using a Highly Multiplexed

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/15/2020

    This session will review a case study for Imaging Mass Cytometry (IMC) is a cutting-edge technique, which enables high dimensional, single-cell spatial and morphological analysis of tissue samples.

    Imaging Mass Cytometry (IMC) is a cutting-edge technique, which enables high dimensional, single-cell spatial and morphological analysis of tissue samples. IMC combines immunohistochemistry staining and rare earth metals isotope as a reporter on the antibodies against the biomarkers. The currently available techniques such as multispectral imaging and confocal microscopy enable us to study only a limited number of markers, whereas we can study up to 37 plus markers using IMC. In this study, we used an immune panel to characterize various cell populations of the lymph node tissue section to study the tissue microenvironment and spatial arrangement of various cell types. To characterize immune cells, we used CD3, CD4, FOXP3, CD8a, CD45RA, and CD45RO. Macrophages were characterized by CD68, CD11c, and CD163. Immune checkpoints, which are negative regulators of the immune system, were identified using PD1, PDL1, and LAG3. The presence of Ki67 positive cells indicated proliferation and vimentin along with collagen were used as structural markers. Together, in a single experiment, we were able to investigate more than 30 markers to distinguish various cell types along with tissue structural markers, which is impossible with conventional imaging platforms like immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Imaging data generated using the IMC is highly useful to study tissue heterogeneity and spatial arrangement of the immune cell types. Furthermore, high dimensional data generated by IMC enables us to discover novel phenotypic clusters, which can be a powerful tool for the development of personalized medicine and can accelerate biomarker discovery.

    CEUs: This histology course is worth 1 continuing education credit. Course is available for 365 days from date of purchase. 

    Mohan Singh,

    Research Scientist

    A basic research scientist with extensive experience in cancer-related to cellular signaling pathways, proteomics, and confocal microscopy. Highly experienced in cutting-edge single-cell proteomics using CyTOF and Imaging Mass Cytometry (IMC). I have earned a PhD in Biochemistry from Panjab University, Chandigarh, India. Acquired first postdoctoral training in chemoresistance resistance and cancer signaling pathway, at the University of Quebec, Canada. Then I joined as a postdoctoral fellow at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Department of Hematology/Oncology, Los Angeles, California, USA. Where I studied the roles of PID1, a novel tumor suppressor protein in cancer cell metabolism in brain tumors. Later, I joined as a research associate at the University of Southern California (USC), Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA. Where I studied the role of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in hematological malignancies, particularly in AML. I have also discovered primary cilia first time in the hematopoietic system using confocal microscopy. USC was the part of the early adopter program of Fluidigm, to establish IMC technology for research use, where I got a chance to work on alpha and beta version of IMC and developed the first 37-marker panel for Hodgkin’s lymphoma and Diffused B-cell lymphoma before the commercialization of this technology. Next, I joined as a scientist at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, New York, USA, to establish CyTOF and Imaging Facility at the center of Immunotherapy. I was hired back as a scientist: In charge of Imaging Mass Cytometry Facility, Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience, Convergent Science Initiative in Cancer, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. Where, I have developed novel assays to detect and characterize circulating tumor cells from liquid biopsy samples in prostate, breast and other cancer types. Currently, I am working as an Investigator for Imaging Mass Cytometry at GSK, Collegeville PA.

  • Checkpoint Inhibitors as Cancer Treatments

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/15/2020

    his session will focus on the role of the immune system in the control of tumors and how tumors can diminish this response. We will then explore novel immunotherapies that allow for a return to a functioning immune response. Importantly, we will talk about the histopathology testing required to determine if these treatments will be beneficial to a patient and monitor if they are effective.

    The immune system has developed many mechanisms to activate robust immune responses. There are also very powerful mechanisms to dampen and control that response in order to protect against a damaging and excessive immune response. These dampening systems include immune checkpoint proteins like PD-1, PD-L1, and CTLA-4. These proteins are important to promote self-tolerance by suppressing the activity of T cells and protect against autoimmune responses. Some malignancies have been shown to hijack these checkpoint pathways and “put the brakes on” the immune response so the tumor can evade immune destruction. Therapies, utilizing monoclonal antibodies, have been developed to “release the brakes” on these immune cells and allow the immune response to continue. This therapeutic approach has revolutionized cancer immunotherapy for several tumor types. This session will focus on the role of the immune system in the control of tumors and how tumors can diminish this response. We will then explore novel immunotherapies that allow for a return to a functioning immune response. Importantly, we will talk about the histopathology testing required to determine if these treatments will be beneficial to a patient and monitor if they are effective.

    CEUs: This histology course is worth 1 continuing education credit. Course is available for 365 days from date of purchase. 

    Julie Randolph-Habecker, PhD

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Dr. Randolph-Habecker has over 25 years of histology and pathology experience. She earned a Master’s of Science in Clinical Chemistry and Ph.D. in Pathology from The Ohio State University. After conducting independent research, Julie was the Director of Experimental Histopathology Shared Resources at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle Washington for over 13 years. She has collaborated in many areas including cancer, infectious disease, chronic illnesses, stem cell biology, and developmental biology and has worked extensively with human tissue as well as samples from many model organisms including rodent, canine, non-human primate, and complex xenografts. Julie’s expertise is in immunohistochemistry ranging from antibody optimization and validation to complex multiplexing. In addition to her research pathology knowledge, she also has extensive experience in the laboratory operations, supervision of staff, study design, sample acquisition, and data analysis. Currently she is an Associate Professor of pathology at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences and adjunct professor at Heritage University. Julie teaches pathophysiology, pathology, histology, and physiology to medical and nursing students. She is also involved in establishing histopathology resources in low resource areas.

  • Optimization and Validation of Immunohistochemistry Protocols

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/15/2020

    In this workshop, we will review the principles of immunohistochemistry protocol optimization and approaches to validate an optimized protocol. The advantage of standard pre-analytical processing will be discussed as well as the need for post-analytical interpretation of staining results for quality assurance.

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a process by which antibodies are used to determine the quantity and distribution of specific protein epitopes on histological sections. In the clinical IHC testing lab, formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded specimen sections are mounted onto glass slides. After deparaffinization, epitopes masked by formalin cross-linking are revealed by a chemical and thermal treatment called antigen retrieval. Primary antibodies bind the exposed epitopes, which are then labeled by secondary detection systems, seen as a stain on the tissues under the microscope. This process, or protocol, involves several steps and is unique to every antibody. IHC protocols are optimized so that they meet their fit-for-purpose requirements for accurate interpretation of testing results, while validation ensures that the protocols will perform as specified on a population of patients. Intended purposes may include, for example, detection of a pathologic foreign microorganism, a tumor phenotype, or a surrogate epitope for an underlying genetic mutation. Optimization is a stochastic process. A limited number of analytical variables are manipulated on a trial-and-error basis to achieve consistent staining of cellular and/or extracellular characteristics that fit the intended purpose of the test. These characteristics are specified either by the end-user, such as the pathologist, or from standardized external sources, including reference laboratories or quality assurance schema. Unambiguous staining in the absence of non-specific background are principal features of an optimized protocol. Once established, the optimized protocol is validated by assessing its reproducibility over a range of specimens processed in the testing lab. Validation is best achieved under standardized preanalytical steps, including fixation, processing to embedding and microtomy, applied consistently across all specimens. Excessive variability in these factors can alter antibody performance, causing loss of test-to-test accuracy and potentially impacting negatively on interpretation. While validated protocols should not be altered during real-time testing, continuous quality improvement is necessary in order to maintain current practice standards. If it becomes necessary to alter a validated protocol in operation, re-optimization and re-validation are required before being returning it to testing mode. In this workshop, we will review the principles of immunohistochemistry protocol optimization and approaches to validate an optimized protocol. The advantage of standard pre-analytical processing will be discussed as well as the need for post-analytical interpretation of staining results for quality assurance.

    CEUs: This histology course is worth 1 continuing education credit. Course is available for 365 days from date of purchase. 

    Dr. Kenneth Kao

    Professor, Anatomical Pathology, IHC Lab

    Presently I am a Full Professor in Oncology at Memorial University and Scientific Director of Immunohistochemistry lab, Eastern Health. I have over 50 publications in Developmental Biology and Cancer Research and hold a Patent for a novel diagnostic marker for cancer. I have given invited presentations nationally and internationally and have a keen interest in teaching histology and histopathology to medical and technological students and staff. Most recently my research has been directed towards quality improvement in biomarker testing in the pathology lab and the development of novel molecular and protein-based testing modalities to improve patient outcomes.

  • The Advantages of RNA Probes over DNA Probes for the Detection of HPV HR in Human Pathology

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/15/2020

    This lecture will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of RNA technology against DNA technology.

    When setting up and validating a new testing for the lab, several factors must be taken into consideration. Some of which are time management of the pathologists and the technologists. But the greatest considerations are the quality and ease of reading the test and making a correct diagnosis for the patient. When comparing RNA technology against DNA technology, the advantages and disadvantages of both technologies must be evaluated. Which test will produce the highest quality of staining and be able to be render the most optimal diagnosis? What are the advantages of RNA probes and RNAscope™ technology over DNA probes and DNA technology? Which test is most optimal for correct treatment of tumors of the Head and Neck? This lecture will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of both technologies.

    CEUs: This histology course is worth 1 continuing education credit. Course is available for 365 days from date of purchase. 

    Sheron Lear, HT/HTL(ASCP)QIHC

    Research Development

    CPA Lab

    Sheron Lear is with CPA Lab in Research Development and Education. She is passionate about histology and IHC are her passion and love. She is currently working with mRNA ISH as well as several new antibodies for use in the IHC lab.  She is a well known presenter and teacher, and she is often teaching the team at CPA and anyone who wants to expand their knowledge in histology and IHC. Troubleshooting issues that arise are another of her interests. With over 57 continuous years in the profession, she still loves new challenges.

    Sameer Talwalkar, MD

    Hematopathologist and Medical Director

    CPD

    Dr. Talwalkar is the Hematopathologist and Medical Director, of Molecular Diagnostics Norton Healthcare (CPA Lab).  After receiving his medical degree in 2001 he was a research fellow at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Mumbai India, at the USC Keck School of Medicine in Los Angeles, and at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston TX.  He also did a residency at University of Louisville Hospital and fellowship at MD Anderson and the University of Pittsburgh.  


  • Predictive IHC Markers in Breast Cancer 2020: What Have We Learned?

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/15/2020

    This workshop will review the current state of immunohistochemical testing for estrogen receptor protein, progesterone receptor protein, and HER2 protein overexpression in breast cancer.

    This workshop will review the current state of immunohistochemical testing for estrogen receptor protein, progesterone receptor protein, and HER2 protein overexpression in breast cancer.  Invasive, metastatic, and in situ cancer will be covered.  The importance of pre-analytics and technical issues in IHC testing will be addressed.  Proficiency testing and results from Oncotype DX™ testing will be used to discuss standardization and test validation.

    CEUs: This histology course is worth 1 continuing education credit. Course is available for 365 days from date of purchase. 

    Richard Cartun, MS, PhD

    Director, Histology/Morphologic Proteomics

    Hartford Hospital

    I currently serve as the Director of Histology, Immunopathology, and the Martin M. Berman, MD Morphologic Proteomics Laboratory at Hartford Hospital, a large tertiary care hospital in Hartford, CT.  I have been doing immunohistochemical testing for more than 40 years now and, as a result, have extensive knowledge in the technical aspects and interpretation of this valuable laboratory test.