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  • QLS Exam Prep Course

    Contains 31 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A prep course for taking the ASCP Qualification in Laboratory Safety (QLS) Exam.

    Histology is stated to be one of the most dangerous jobs known. This NSH Qualification in Laboratory Safety (QLS) prep course contains 5 content modules that mirror the topic outline as published by the American Society for Clinical Pathology:  Laboratory Safety: Management, General Safety, Chemical Safety, Biohazard Control, and Physical Environment and aims to provide important safety information.  

    Learning Module Format: The course contains 5 hours of lectures. To ensure this large amount of material is digestible the course has been split into topic modules.

    Knowledge Checks: In each module you will be asked to complete a Knowledge Check(s). Knowledge Checks consist of several questions – asked in a variety of formats - about the section(s) you just completed.

    Final Exam: The course completes with a Final Exam consisting of 20 random questions from the entire question bank.  You will be able to take the exam an unlimited number of times. 



    Donna Chuddley, HT(ASCP

    Histology Supervisor

    Donna Chuddley is the Histology Supervisor at St. Luke's University Health Network.  She has over three decades of experience in pharmaceutical, biotech and clinical histology. Donna enjoys participating on the Health and Safety Committee and has presented in the past on Safety in webinars, Safely Snippets and at Regional and National Meetings. Donna has experience in the laboratory working with paraffin tissue and plastics. Donna has experience in all areas of the laboratory including Immunohistochemistry and Special Stains. Donna enjoys moving new students through the Histology programs offered online and acts as a Supervisor for the Histology Education program at the hospital.  She is an active member of the NSH. 

    Maureen Doran, MS, HTL(ASCP)

    Ms. Doran has been a histologist over 35 years and specializes in laboratory safety. She is co-owner of a woman owned small business that performs animal, plant and research histology. She chaired the NSH Health and Safety committee for 20 years. She is an avid cyclist and certified group fitness instructor who loves to teach Pilates/Yoga. 

    Allison Eck, MS, HTL(ASCP), QLS

    Anatomic Pathology Manager

    Allison Eck is the anatomic pathology manager, co-safety officer of the laboratory, and hospital ergonomic assessor at Doylestown Hospital. She is passionate about safety and currently holds her QLS certification. She enjoys educating people on safety topics, namely ergonomics and hazardous waste handling. She is regular speaker at the NSH Annual Symposium/Convention and an active member of the NSH. 

  • There is an Industrial Hygienist in my Histology Lab

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 08/26/2020

    A look at some common workplace hazards in the Histology Lab and learn what and who is keeping us safe.

    Industrial Hygiene is defined as that science and art devoted to the anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and control of workplace hazards, which may cause sickness, impaired health and disease. What are those potential hazards that may lurk in your lab? Who is this person in my lab and what does their sniffer detect? We will look at some common workplace hazards in the Histology Lab and learn what and who is keeping us safe.

    Joseph Rambo, CIH, MS

    Staff Industrial Hygiene Specialist and Industrial Hygiene Lead

    Mr. Rambo is the Staff Industrial Hygiene Specialist and Industrial Hygiene Lead for the Americas with Janssen Research and Development and is located in Spring House PA.  Mr. Rambo is a Board-Certified Industrial Hygienist who specializes in chemical exposure assessments.  He golds a Masters in Science from Temple University, and Bachelors of Science from Drexel.  He enjoys working directly with researchers to ensure a long and healthy career.  In his spare time, Mr. Rambo enjoys the outdoors, whether it’s hiking with his kids, gardening in the back yard or starting a Birding Club at work

  • The Total Test Approach to IHC Standardization

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/22/2020

    This session will explore the challenges to standardization factored into the approach, and how it can be utilized to improve standardization in any laboratory setting.

    Standardization is a continual challenge in immunohistochemical testing. When considering the various parameters involved (i.e. tissue acquisition, fixation, protocol steps, reagents, instrumentation), this is not surprising; however, consistency and reproducibility are more important than ever. The prominence of personalized medicine, particularly companion diagnostics, has increased clinical accessibility to antibodies capable of identifying mutated or abnormally expressed proteins which are then targeted by therapeutic drugs. Consistency and reproducibility are also important in research in order to validate antibodies and their results. Aside from understanding the significance, the process and approach to standardization can be overwhelming. In the 1990s, a more rigorous ‘Total Test’ approach was recommended for IHC assays. This approach offers a comprehensive, methodical review by categorizing the factors that affect consistency and reproducibility. This session will explore the challenges to standardization factored into the approach, and how it can be utilized to improve standardization in any laboratory setting.

    Kimberly Feaster, HTL(ASCP)QIHC

    Program Director, Histology

    Kimberly Feaster is a professor at West Virginia University.  Ms. Feaster has experience as a bench Histotechnologist and supervisor in research and hospital histology laboratories. She is currently the director of the Histotechnology program at West Virginia University. She holds a masters degree, her HTL, and her QIHC.  In addition to running the program at West Virginia – she is an active volunteer with the NSH.  She is an active member of the NSH Education Committee.  Volunteering her time and expertise for many years to the various projects and programs

  • Remembering Why: A Review Of Patient Case Studies

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/17/2020

    This webinar will share patient cases and remind laboratory staff how important their role is in the process of making a diagnosis, the significance of having a high quality product will be not only be because a guideline says so, but because a patient behind that sample is counting on it.

    Tissue, blocks, and slides are handled in histology laboratories every day. Procedures and safety measures are put in place to ensure that materials are processed in ways that are consistent with high expectations and quality outcomes. However, it is also important to remember why those specimens are ultimately available: patients. Along with guidelines that histologists need to abide by, maintaining high quality is crucial because of the person behind the specimen. Throughout the presentation, case studies will connect technical expertise back to the patient. Clinical components will be reviewed, such as patient symptoms and subsequent procedures. After tissue samples are retrieved, specimens are sent to histology laboratories for processing, where participants will have the opportunity to take a more investigative look into how specific testing was selected. Diagnostic factors will be discussed and will correlate how histologists contribute to pathologic findings.  Not having the traditional patient interaction can cause the histologist to dissociate the specimen from the patient. By sharing patient cases and reminding laboratory staff how important their role is in the process of making a diagnosis, the significance of having a high quality product will be not only be because a guideline says so, but because a patient behind that sample is counting on it.

    Tiffany Mainella

    Education Specialist

    Ms. Mainella is currently serving as an education specialist and histotechnologist in the Histology Laboratory at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN.  She has worked in the laboratory for eight years, and has been the education specialist for six of those years.  She coordinates training for new employees and histology students, manages competencies and continuing education for all histology employees, works n process improvement projects with other members of the histology management and support teams, and other various tasks within the laboratory and across work units. 

  • Can the Use of the More Esoteric Antibodies Aid in Optimizing the Diagnosis for the Patient?

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/16/2020

    This workshop will consist of the technical aspects as well as the interpretive views and experience of the pathologist in using adn selecting more esoteric antibodies.

    Many Histology labs today also include Immunohistochemistry as an essential part of surgical pathology. However, the use of the more esoteric antibodies are often left to a larger lab for several reasons; some include validation time, tech experience and tech time setting up the new antibodies, cost.  But is this optimal for the patient? Utilizing more esoteric antibodies one can better diagnosis subtle differences between a disease process such as an inflammatory process, versus an autoimmune disease versus a carcinoma. Locating a source for the esoteric antibodies can be challenging. Which clone or polyclonal do I choose? Various other analytic considerations are; titer, pretreatment, protocol, the chromogen. To. Prior to the test going ‘Live’, positive controls will be needed and the technologists performing the test will need to sign off on the test. Some of these antibodies are CXCR5, Carbonic anhydrase, NKX3.1, Olig 2, and IMP3. This workshop will consist of the technical aspects as well as the interpretive views and experience of the pathologist.

    Sheron Lear, HT/HTL(ASCP)QIHC

    Research Development

    Sheron Lear is with CPA Lab in Research Development and Education. She is passionate about histology and IHC are her passion and love. She is currently working with mRNA ISH as well as several new antibodies for use in the IHC lab.  She is a well known presenter and teacher, and she is often teaching the team at CPA and anyone who wants to expand their knowledge in histology and IHC. Troubleshooting issues that arise are another of her interests. With over 57 continuous years in the profession, she still loves new challenges.

    Dr. Sameer Talwakar

    Hematopathologist and Medical Director

    Dr. Talwalkar is the Hematopathologist and Medical Director, of Molecular Diagnostics Norton Healthcare (CPA Lab).  After receiving his medical degree in 2001 he was a research fellow at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Mumbai India, at the USC Keck School of Medicine in Los Angeles, and at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston TX.  He also did a residency at University of Louisville Hospital and fellowship at MD Anderson and the University of Pittsburgh.  


  • Fix It or Forget It!!!

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/15/2020

    Without a proper understanding of fixation and how it affects all aspects of histology, we will continue to struggle to provide diagnosable slides, this webinar will cover those issues.

    Poor fixation is a problem that exists in most settings and can be devastating to research, pathology diagnosis, and ultimately, patient care. In the research setting, most of the work relies heavily on IHC and molecular analysis. IHC staining has significantly increased in the clinical setting as well. Without a proper understanding of fixation and how it affects all aspects of histology, we will continue to struggle to provide diagnosable slides. Having a strong understanding of fixative types and when they are best applied to projects will play a major role in achieving the best results. We owe it to patients involved in clinical trials, animals used for testing, and families anxiously awaiting feedback to make sure each sample is collected and fixed for success. 

    Jennifer Matta

    Research Associate II

    Ms. Matta is currently a Research Associate II in the Pathology/Histotechnology Laboratory located at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) at the National Cancer Institute, Frederick MD.  She is a histologist and Assistant Manager of the Histotechnology Lab that supports basic science research and drug development.  She is also employed by Trivergent Health at Frederick Memorial Hospital where she works in the histology laboratory. Working in both a research and a clinical setting play an important role in her approach to histology. And, I think anyone who has had a foot in each door, can attest – it is an in valuable perspective.

  • The Pitfalls of Over-Engineering: Recognizing and Rectifying The Problems We Created 

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/14/2020

    Attendees will explore multiple real world examples of over-engineering and its consequences before learning was to design efficient, and correct inefficient, processes and tools.

    Over-engineering is a term commonly used in software development to describe programs that include unnecessary elements which create complications for end users. However, the term can also be applied to other fields of work. Laboratories require systems to manage everything from bench procedures to personnel policies, as well as tools to support and maintain them. Too often, cumbersome tools are not user-friendly and systems can fall apart or at best, become underutilized. In worst case scenarios, over-engineering can be a catalyst for purposely completing tasks improperly. This presentation explores what happens when good intentions create tools and processes that are difficult to follow or include unnecessary work for end users.

    Attendees will explore multiple real world examples of over-engineering and its consequences before learning was to design efficient, and correct inefficient, processes and tools. Examples will include situations related to documentation, management of personnel and operational workflows, and provide commentary on the perspectives of both laboratory leaders and staff. 

    A. Danielle Johnsrud, MBA, HTL

    Assistant Supervisor

    Ms. Johnsrud has worked in Histology at Mayo Clinic Rochester since 2008 and have held almost every role in the lab, including Lab Assistant, HT, HTL, Grossing Tech and is currently one of three Assistant Supervisors. During this time, she has completed her Bachelors degree and MBA-Healthcare Management. Since 2014, she has partnered with the lab's Education Specialist to facilitate a mentorship program for staff who want to complete/present posters or workshops at the NSH Annual Symposium. To date, she has also facilitated three workshops at NSH and presented one poster. 

  • To Waste or Not to Waste

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/13/2020

    This webinar will cover requirements/regulations of satellite accumulation and waste disposal; Identify common hazards in the histology laboratory; Identify appropriate handling and storage of laboratory waste.

    As one of the top hazardous occupations in the United States, histology's major safety concerns revolve around the hazardous chemicals and waste generated in the laboratory.  This safety workshop focuses on identifying the common hazards in the laboratory, understanding the requirements and regulations of satellite accumulation and waste disposal, and identifying appropriate handling and storage of laboratory waste.  Attendees will understand the difference between waste storage and satellite accumulation, as well as the regulations for both.  Common EPA deficiencies pertaining to waste and spills are discussed.  Both basic and obscure knowledge is shared, along with helpful tips to improve the safety of your laboratory. -- 

    AnnaStacia Penrod, BS, MBA, HTL(ASCP)

    Account Executive

    • Ms. Penrod is currently an Account Executive with Epredia.  Prior to joining Epredia she was Histology Lab Supervisor with Quest Diagnostic and a Histology Lab Supervisor with Mercy Medical Center. She holds her MBA, and is currently working her Doctorate of Philosophy.  She holds a Bachelors of Science from Iowa State University and was awarded her HTL in 2014. 

  • Theory and Application of Silver Stains in the Histology Laboratory

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/24/2020

    This webinar will review silver stains, their importance, and uses.

    The silver stains used and performed in the histology lab are complex and diverse.  They provide an everyday unique challenge to histologic preparation and staining results. Generally, five various chemical categories are used for this application.  These include argentaffin, argyrophilic, impregnation, oxidation-reduction, and metallic-metallic reactions. They stain and demonstrate a wide array of tissue components and constituents including bacteria, fibers, basement membranes, carbohydrates, glycoproteins, and axons. Examples and chemical mechanisms of each technique will be examined and discussed. Other nuances of these procedures will be discussed from an end user perspective. Stain automation has prevented a full comprehension of key reactions that occur during these silver procedures.  

    Debra Siena, HT(ASCP),QIHC

    Debra Siena, HT(ASCP) QIHC, is Technical Support Manager with StatLab in McKinney, TX.  She is an active member of the NSH, frequent speaker at the Annual NSH S/C, and state meetings, and is committed to helping others achieve success in the laboratory. 

  • HT Prep Course

    Contains 27 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The NSH HT Exam Prep Course is designed for students that are studying for the HT certification exam.

    The NSH HT Exam Prep Course is designed for students that are studying for the HT certification exam.  It is especially beneficial to those that are taking the exam through the on-the-job training route. The course will include exam content, study material and resources available to help with the studying process.  The course will also explain the concept of computer adaptive testing and time will be spent discussing exam taking strategies.   Review topics include Fixation, Processing, Microtomy, Staining, Special Stains Immunohistochemistry and Lab Math. 

    Learning Module Format: The course contains several hours of lectures. To ensure this large amount of material is digestible the course has been split into topic modules.

    Knowledge Checks: At the conclusion of each section you will be asked to complete a Knowledge Check. Knowledge Checks consist of several questions – asked in a variety of formats - about the section you just completed.

    Final Exam: The course completes with a Final Exam consisting of 20 questions. You must receive a 70% or better to receive your certificate of completion for your CEU credits for the course.

    Jamie Pert, BS, HTL(ASCP)cm, MBcm, QIHCcm

    Jamie is the Program Director of the Schools of Histotechnology (HT and HTL) programs at Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan. Previous to that she worked as a bench histotechnologist in the immunohistochemistry/molecular lab of anatomic pathology at Beaumont Hospital, and in that time she also worked as a contingent histotechnologist in private GI and Dermatopathology laboratories. Jamie completed her B.S. at Grand Valley State University and she is certified as a histotechnologist (HTL), molecular biologist (MB), and also has her Qualification in Immunohistochemistry (QIHC) through ASCP. 

    Ada Feldman, MS, HT(ASCP), HTL(ASCP)

    Ada Feldman is the CEO at ANATECH, LTD, Battle Creek, MI. She has multiple publications and recently co-written Tissue Processing and Hematoxylin and Eosin Staining in Histopathology Methods and Protocols and Laboratory Safety in Theory and Practice of Histological Techniques, 8th edition. She is frequently invited to speak at state, national and international histology seminars and for webinars. She has received several National Society for Histotechnology awards (J.B. McCormick, M.D. Award; Golden Forcep Award, and Convention Award) as well as several awards from state histology societies. Ada has held several positions including President and Treasurer in the Michigan Society of Histotechnologists.